About

Before I came to live in Japan in 2008, it was all Godzilla, big cities and geisha in my mind.   Yeah, Japan was one big cliché populated by sumo wrestlers and pretty much everybody ate sushi for breakfast, lunch and dinner.  Guess what, I was way off and  I now realize that my imperfect preconception of Japan has nothing to do with my daily life in the countryside of Hiroshima prefecture where I live and teach.

My Japan is a tiny village in the middle of mountains where my house is surrounded by rice fields and bamboo forest, nothing to do with the big city life I had envisioned before getting here.

This is view from my kitchen on a foggy morning.

My daily foodie life in the Japanese countryside became and still is a very unique challenge.   Here is a few reason why:

  • There is pretty much no restaurant in the immediate vicinity of my house.
  • There is only a tiny supermarket in the area, none near my house.
  • My first kitchen was tiny, old,  dirty and ill equipped

Yet, my foodie determination was unshaken, I would find and cook my way through this less than perfect situation.

So this blog is all about how I am learning to cook Japanese food and my restaurant experiences far and wide.  I spend most of my time in the prefecture of Hiroshima and Okayama, but I often travel around Japan and my foodie interested often expend beyond Japan  since I am trying to visit as many countries in Asia I possibly can.

You will find very few Tokyo-centric references in my post, it’s all about local food and local taste. I got nothing against Tokyo, I just live too darn far to partake in Michelin guide 4 stars dinning

The lack of proper supermarkets lead me to try to to cook with only what I could find in my area. I am surrounded by farmlands and some amazing seasonal vegetables and fruits are available at the farmers market.

I will try to post some of the stuff I cook in my tiny kitchen and see if it’s possible to keep it local.

Enjoy and don’t hesitate to post comments

p5rn7vb

5 thoughts on “About

  1. gt

    Very nicely written. Please share some of your early experiences, how you adapted,what you cooked & ate. Any photographs ofyour home and countryside? We should love to learn more about those fantastic fruit & vegetables, their seaons, and especially, the people who grow them [if you have befriended any].

    Thanks. Be well.

    A waka for the autumn:

    Kokoro naki

    Mi ni mo no aware wa

    Shirare keri

    Shigi tatsu sawa no

    Aki no yu_gure.

    Reply
  2. Lutz Dittmann & Family (8 Berlioz)

    Dear Luc,
    the earthquake this week made us wonder whether it affected you at all and we started searching for you on the Internet. This blog must be yours?! We hope you are safe and well. Your blog is quite interesting (we love Japanese food a lot!) and we will try to read it on a regular basis.

    Best regards
    The Dittmann Family (your ex-neighbors on Berlioz)

    Reply

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